permaculture

Zaytuna Farm

Take a sweeping 20-minute tour of our 66-acre Zaytuna Farm property. Throughout, I explain specific features of the farm, how these things came together, and why the farm was designed as you see it. If some terms aren’t familiar, we have included a detailed explanation below and to learn, even more, check out my Permaculture Masterclass series, HERE: https://www.discoverpermaculture.com/... Zaytuna Farm went into development in 2001 with earthworks for the mainframe water system. The tour starts along the oldest, largest swale on the property, and it supports a well-established food forest, which includes jackfruit, mango, custard apples, Brazil cherries, pecans, and more. The productive forest is designed to mimic a natural forest, and the swale helps to hydrate the property. With systems like these, the farm is continually improving into a drought-proof, flood-proof, and extremely stable landscape. Swale: A swale is a water-harvesting and tree-growing system that resembles a ditch, only it sits level and holds water until it soaks into the landscape rather than draining water away. Swales are on slopes, and the lower side of swales are bordered with berms (mounds of soil) into which trees are planted. Food Forest: A food forest is a designed forest meant to replicate what happens in natural forests but with a diverse collection, a polyculture, of productive (and supportive) trees and plants operating from the root level to the overstory. Chop-and-Drop: Support trees and plants, particularly grown for their nitrogen-fixing and biomass-producing abilities, are regularly cut (“chopped”), and the prunings are left on the forest floor (“dropped”) to decompose, creating fertile soil and fostering fungal networks. Chinampa: Chinampas are an ancient agricultural method that combines shallow water systems for raising fish and aquatic crops with artificial islands and/or peninsulas for growing land crops. This method is considered one of the most successful and sustainable in history. The main gardens on Zaytuna farm have been in continuous production for over 12 years. They grow the main volume of vegetables on the farm, and their soils are constantly revitalized with compost provided by two chicken tractor systems. The two chicken tractors yield one cubic meter of compost each every week, so it’s no wonder the fertility of the soil continual improves. Geoff walks us through double-reach row upon row of crops: potatoes, daikon, snow peas, bak choy, cabbages, field peas, onions, garlic, carrots, beetroots, Romanesque, broad beans, etc. On the outside of the rows and occasionally betwixt them are alley crops of leucaena, a nitrogen-fixing legume, which are being groomed as high pollards. This is where the big, bulky crops are produced, and the system could be replicated for sustainable market production. Chicken tractor: A chicken coop that, beyond just raising chickens/eggs, is used to process waste materials and produce compost. They are typically movable and often relocated to also aid in weed and pest control via the chickens feeding on them. Bathtub worm farm: Worms make fantastic fertilizer via their castings (poop) and the juice, and bathtubs make great homes for worms, as well as easily harvesting these castings and this worm juice. The bottom of tubs are lined so that juice drip through the drain, and they are filled with manure and organic materials for the worms to eat. Zaytuna also has special waste systems: composting toilets and reed beds. All of the toilets onsite are composting. They are flushed with sawdust or shredded organic matter, and when they are full, they are emptied into wire baskets in the forest to sit for 9-10 months. The processed compost is spread around trees, and it is completely safe to handle and looks like typical forest mulch. Geoff grabs a handful and sniffs it to demonstrate. There is a large reed bed system made with two concrete bays. Water comes from the kitchen through a grease trap then a septic tank then reed roots before emptying into a leach field that soaks towards productive systems. There is also polypropylene reed bed suitable for one household that functions the same way as the commercial one. Cell-grazing: Animals are fenced in and allowed to graze small sections (cells) of the land for a set amount of time, often a day or a few days, before being moved on. This maintains the land and feeds the livestock without degrading the landscape. Wilderness: an integral part of permaculture design and a place which nourishes us and the planet.

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Profitable Farming and Designing for Farm Success

Tools and horticultural techniques make up the best part of what makes a diversified vegetable operation profitable, but in this presentation, JM Fortier, will discuss how the design stage of any farm might be even more important. Gleaning for the experience of his own 2-acre market garden and that of a new 5 acres one, he’s currently setting up, JM will elaborate of some of the design principles he has followed.

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What Cuba can teach America about organic farming

Many people in America are proponents of the organic food movement, and worried about the potentially harmful effects of pesticides on their health or the environment. In Cuba, farmers have gone organic for a very different reason – they had to. In this final instalment of our series “The Cuban Evoltion” Jeffrey Brown looks at food and farming.

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The Most Abundant Tropical Food Forest Tour Yet!

Is there such thing as too much abundance? That is the official question of this extra exciting virtual tour. You are going to be blown away with the amount of production in under 8 years of Paul Zink's priceless, precious time on this land at Finca Madre in Alajuela, Costa Rica. (filmed April 2018.) You name the rare tropical fruit... he has it! We geeked out on everything ripe & ready. We hope you enjoy this trip & we leave you enlightened & inspired! Paul is a botanical collector & quite the master at plant propogation. His collection of tropical fruits & vegetables has been counted as 430 different edible species.

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STEP E3 - Working with Soil

STEP is a six-year permaculture program in the Province of Isabela which aims to improve the existing conditions of the people and environment of different selected communities based on specific ecosystems. It aims to improve the existing mode of employment while also taking care of the environment through enhancement of low-key technologies to generate sustainable livelihood activities. This video is a part of a series where the program features alternative, organic, low-key activities on how to enhance the environment as well as implying a permaculture framework on each and every individual who will watch this.
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STEP E2 - Step program

Part 2 of our 9-part video of the STEP Program in Isabela. The video explains all about the different core components of the project from systems-thinking and permaculture learning, sustainable technologies, and social trading.
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STEP E1 - Systems Thinking

STEP is a six-year permaculture program in the Province of Isabela which aims to improve the existing conditions of the people and environment of different selected communities based on specific ecosystems. It aims to improve the existing mode of employment while also taking care of the environment through enhancement of low-key technologies to generate sustainable livelihood activities. This video is a part of a series where the program features alternative, organic, low-key activities on how to enhance the environment as well as implying a permaculture framework on each and every individual who will watch this.
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Organic Farming in the Jungle of Mexico

Working for DoGoodAsYouGo takes me to some amazing places. Lo De Marcos is no different! Beyond the COSTCO and WALMART there are communities that regaining putting balance back into their communities. they are doing this by making plans to create what they need...and focusing on quality not profit. The number one goal of El Paraiso: To provide healthy food for the community, and it must be available for everyone. Tim and Liza have been doing this for the last 3 years. They have developed a 3 tier model of sustainability; Environmental, Social, and Economic. Each level must remain satisfied if the Organic Farm is to succeed. What they have seen is an incredible out pour from the community in volunteering. This has been vital in helping keep the prices low making products available for the whole community to while the farm continues to grow.
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My Permaculture Garden - Morag Gamble

Discover Morag Gamble’s award-winning permaculture garden at the Australian ecovillage, Crystal Waters Permaculture Village. Morag takes you for a wander through her edible landscape - the kitchen garden and food forest - sharing design ideas, her low-input garden philosophy and talks about these 55 useful plants….

1:14 Lemon Myrtle - Backhousia citriodora
1:49 Cranberry Hibiscus - Hibiscus acetosella
2:21 Society Garlic - Tulbaghia violecea
3:12 Mustard Spinach - Brassica juncea
4:14 Snow Peas - Pisum sativum var. saccharatum
4:39 Carrot - Daucus carota subsp. sativus
5:49 Sweet Potato - Ipomoea batatas
6:23 Pumpkin - Cucurbita pepo
6:56 Pepino - Solanum muricatum
7:16 Dwarf Washington Navel Orange - Citrus sinensis 'Washington Navel’
8:10 Comfrey - Symphytum officinale
9:36 Pigeon Pea - Cajanus cajan
10:52 Yacon - Smallanthus sonchifolius
11:51 Turmeric - Curcurma longa
13:08 Pelargonium /Scented Geranium - Pelargonium graveolens
13:57 Madagascar Bean - Phaseolus lunatus
15:23 Brazilian Spinach - Alternanthera sissoo
16:18 Surinam Spinach - Talinum triangulare
16:40 Green Frills Mustard Spinach - Brassica juncea
16:55 Society Garlic - Tulbaghia violecea
17:01 Asparagus - Asparagus officinalis
17:25 Giant Red Mustard Spinach - Brassica juncea
18:23 Cherry Tomato - Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme
18:50 Perennial Welsh Onion - Allium fistulosum L.
19:39 Chilli - Capsicum annum
19:47 Aloe Vera - Aloe barbadensis
20:20 Yarrow - Achillea millefolium
20:34 Rocket/Arugula - Eruca sativa
21:19 Kale - Brassica oleracea var. sabellica
21:29 Broccoli - Brassica oleracea var. italica
22:23 Laos Ginger / Galangal - Alpinia galanga
22:28 Chilli - Capsicum annum
24:14 Blue Java (Ice cream) Banana - Musa acuminata x bulbisiana
24:50 Tulsi - Ocinum sanctum
25:47 Imperial Mandarin - Citrus reticulata 'Imperial'
26:38 Dwarf Blood Orange - Citrus sinensis
27:24 Acerola/Barbados Cherry - Malpighia emarginata
27:39 Jaboticaba - Myrciaria cauliflora
27:58 Malabar chestnut - Pachira acquatica
27:58 Lilly Pilly - Syzygium leuhmannii
28:14 Bottlebrush - Callistemon viminalis
28:41 Buddha’s Hand - Citrus medica var. sarcodactylis
29:32 Tahitian Lime - Citrus x latifolia
29:38 Hickson Mandarin - Citrus reticulata ‘Hickson'
29:49 Ruby Grapefruit - Citrus x paradisi
29:54 Fig - Ficus carica
30:11 Bay Tree - Laurus nobilis
30:18 Lemongrass - Cymbopogon citratus
30:29 Dragon Fruit - Hylocereus undutas
31:10 Native Ginger - Alpinia caerulea
31:24 Cassava - Manihot esculenta
31:42 Olive - Olea europaea
31:54 Pawpaw - Carica papaya
33:04 Kang Kong/Water Spinach - Ipomoea aquatica
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